Conservatorship

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About Conservatorship

Conservatorship is a serious matter.  It requires a court hearing with all interested parties present.  If the conservatorship is established, the individual or conservatee loses many civil rights most of us take for granted.  He or she may lose the right to decide where they'll live or what medical treatment to accept or refuse.  They may lose the right to control their assets or manage their income.  The conservator, by assuming the responsibility for these matters, becomes legally accountable to the court.

What Are the Primary Duties of a Conservator?

The court can appoint a conservator of the person only or both person and estate. The following is a brief summary of a conservator's duties.

Conservatorship of the Person:

The conservator arranges for the client's care and protection, determines where he or she will live and makes appropriate arrangements for health care, housekeeping, transportation, and personal needs.

Conservatorship of the Estate:

The conservator manages the client's finances, locates and takes control of the assets, collects income due, pays bills, invests the client's money, and protects the assets.